Brian Braudis’ 1-Minute Morning Memo: September 7, 2020 – Labor Day

Anyone who has ever worked is to be recognized and thanked on Labor Day.

The first Labor Day was September 5, 1882. It’s a holiday created by the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contribution workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.

Even if you don’t formally go to work, you are still part of the labor movement. The movement includes copious support workers like parents, providers and care givers

This year, we must especially recognize and thank front-line workers in the face of a global pandemic. The list is too extensive and nuanced to include them all here.

But I’ve been noticing these people in my community.

  • Medical workers
  • Community butcher
  • Grocery store workers
  • Hair salon employees
  • UPS/FedEx delivery and counter workers
  • Postal workers

We went to a local restaurant with some friends and, of course, ate outdoors with plastic forks, aluminum plates—everything was disposable.

The workers scurried around lighting “bug candles,” filling plastic water cups, and meeting patron’s needs.

Our waitress had a sweaty brow. She took our order and said, “it’s not bad. I can’t wait to lose these gloves and take off the mask, that’s all.”

As we were finishing, she thanked us for the generous tip, and we thanked her for her service, and she said, “I really appreciate it. I could cry. Not everyone has that kind of attitude.”

What is needed now is gratitude, folks. We need to do better this Labor Day. Please do it for yourself!

I started donating blood for the first time because it’s one small thing I can do with little effort. As I investigated the whole program, I learned that 70% of those who donate once don’t return.

I made sure to return continuously. I’m scheduled for my third donation in late October.

Happy Labor Day!!